Mjölby

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I have reached the town of Mjölby, which is much much smaller than I thought. If I had not stopped for a minute to check my phone, I would have missed it.

  
It’s almost what the people of Delaware say about the state : if you’re on the highway to Washington and sneezed, then you just missed Delaware. It probably helps them staying a fiscal paradise too. Even on a bike it felt small.
 
So I did a rather short day and did in two days what I wanted to do… in two days. Except I didn’t rest. Today was ok, I’ll see how it goes further down the road. But there’s only four days left now. On Monday morning I’ll be in Stockholm. I hope I haven’t forgotten anything in Paris, or I will have to turn back.

  
Escaping Gränna and the Vättern lake was easier than I thought. The road followed the lake for 20kms, then gradually turned west, going slowly up all the time, until it was a plateau more or less all the way. The wind remains light, and coming from the south. I much prefer seeing the wind turnbines facing me than showing me their metallic butts. On the other hand, no bike lanes of any kind. But the traffic remains low, as there’s still the highway close by.

  
It was a beautiful day, still quite warm, and three hours pass by very fast in these conditions. I’ve also been passed again by a very fast cyclist – it happens about once a day now. I go ok, maybe 20-22k, and a guy (a gal once), whizz by, just as if I was stopped. They certainly have better and lighter bikes, that’s not hard to find, still, it requires a strength and stamina I don’t have. That reminds me of the race around the lake, when people do 300kms in less than 10 hours. I could probably reach this average for 30 or 40 minutes, but then I’d be dead. You got to push hard constantly to maintain such a speed. I’m really not here for that – although I could have done this trip in two weeks instead of four – I want to enjoy it as well.

  
When going through Väderstad, which means Vader’s town, of course, I saw a very nice touch of welcoming any passing French visitor, with both flags raised. Merci pour ce moment !

  

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